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Welcome

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Hunger In America

hunger-america

1 in 7 Americans need Food Assistance programs

Although too many Americans the economy appears to be stronger now and more people are back at work the reality for many families is just the opposite. 1 in 7, over 14% or to put it another way over 50 million Americans are relying on assistance just to eat. Many individuals and families who were struck hard by the recession are simply being left behind. They are all turning to programs like The Quinn House in order to feed themselves and their families. The Quinn House staff and guests spend most of their work week fulfilling requests for food assistance. We would like to do more, to help more however we need more help from the community in the form of monetary donations and canned/non-perishable food drives. If you or your organization can help us meet this great need please call our office at (770) 962-0470. Please see this report from National Geographic Daily News for more information.

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Our Food Outreach

Of all of the Quinn House outreach programs, our food ministry is by far the largest. The Quinn House is a licensed food bank and food pantry helping to stock 15 different food pantries in both North and East Central Georgia. Last year we distributed more than $1,000,000.00 in food. This figure does not include the time put in by our staff and volunteers to collect and distribute the food. We send several vans out every day to collect food from many different donators including Kroger, Publix Supermarkets, Ingles, Target Stores,  and Pepperidge Farms. These food items are brought back to our location in Lawrenceville where our staff and volunteers sort the items brought in, then the bulk of the donations are distributed to other ministries who come to us so they can feed the needy families in their areas. Last year these ministries fed over 700 families per week.  And last year they provided over 100,000 meals valued at over one-half million dollars.

Read more: Our Food Outreach

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Women's House Closing Temporarily

 

Due to economic and staffing issues, the Quinn House is sorry to announce that we are suspending the Women’s Housing Program. We will no longer be taking any new female residents into the program. In the meantime, we continue to search for ways to fund this part of our program so that we may re-open this much needed resource in Gwinnett County.

PLEASE NOTE: We will continue to help women with food, school supplies, clothing, and referrals to other resources when necessary. 

Thank you to all for your continued support of the Quinn House. 

 

 

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Our Recovery Program

Instead of a more traditional program that treats addiction as a disease, we adhere to the belief that addiction is a choice-based disorder.  In other words, if you continually make the same choices, they eventually become part of your automatic or habitual behavior. The key word here is choice. Webster defines “choice” as the act of selecting; the power of choosing or that you have options.

Read more: Our Recovery Program

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The Quinn House Difference

I recently had a discussion with one of our past guests. We talked about how his life had turned around since he left the Quinn House and the role we had played in his new found success. I was quite taken by the excitement in his voice, as he explained the difference in his new attitude.  He stated that he had received more than just a second chance.

Read more: The Quinn House Difference